This week, The Invested Dads are introducing the first episode of a brand-new series, Listener Questions! The guys have selected several questions that were sent in by listeners and through their social media channels. In this episode they discuss whether married couples should have joint or separate bank accounts, investing in cryptocurrency, if you can start saving later in life while still retiring, and much more! 

Main Talking Points

[1:38] – How Did Josh & Austin Get the Idea to Launch the Podcast?
[3:17] – Should You Fully Pay Off Debt or Pay the Balance Due & Increase Your Savings?
[6:09] – Should Married Couples Have Joint or Separate Bank Accounts?
[9:21] – Should You Invest in Cryptocurrency?
[11:19] – If You Could Interview Any CEO, Who Would It Be?
[13:59] – How Do I Simplify My Life?
[16:02] – What’s The Most Important Thing in Josh & Austin’s Life?
[16:51] – What’s The Best Finance Principle You Can Teach Your Kids?
[18:37] – What Did Josh & Austin Want to Be as Kids?
[20:20] – Can You Start Saving at 50 & Still Retire?
[23:18] – Dad Joke of the Week
[23:32] – If Josh & Austin Had to Write a Fiction Book, What Would the Plot Be?

Links & Resources

The Economics of Formula 1 – The Invested Dads Podcast

Invest With Us – The Invested Dads

Free Guide: 8 Timeless Principles of Investing

Social Media

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

YouTube

Full Transcript

Welcome to The Invested Dads Podcast. Simplifying financial topics so that you can take action and make your financial situation better. Helping you to understand the current world of financial planning and investments, here are your hosts, Josh Robb and Austin Wilson.

Austin Wilson:
All right. Hey, welcome back to The Invested Dads Podcast, a podcast where we take you on a journey to better your financial future. I am Austin Wilson, Research Analyst at Hixon Zuercher Capital Management.

Josh Robb:
I am Josh Robb, Director of Financial Planning at Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. So Austin, how can people help us with this podcast?

Austin Wilson:
Well, specifically with this special episode, which we’re going to talk about in a second, we would love it if you would email us any questions, any ideas, any thoughts you have to hello@theinvesteddads.com. We read every single email we get and we would love-

Josh Robb:
Even the spam and junk.

Austin Wilson:
Even spam and junk. We would love for you to send us some questions, some topics you would like to talk about, but it’s because of your questions that we are able to do an episode that we’re going to do today, and that is we are going to be answering your questions. So we’ve compiled a list of questions that we’ve gotten from listeners, and we are excited to go through and answer your questions.

Josh Robb:
Wait, before you go, not only can they email us ideas, but we are on Instagram and Facebook-

Austin Wilson:
You could DM us.

Josh Robb:
Facebook, you could send us questions there and we will see it as well.

Austin Wilson:
I’ll give you Josh’s personal cell phone number.

Josh Robb:
Yes. Either way, whatever works for you.

Austin Wilson:
So yes, we are answering your questions today, and we would love it if you would send us more so we can do more episodes like this where we talk about what you want us to talk about. So let’s just get down to it, Josh.

Josh Robb:
Yes. We compiled some questions.

[1:38] – How Did Josh & Austin Get the Idea to Launch the Podcast?

Austin Wilson:
We’ve got a lot of options here. So here we go. How did you/we, get the idea to launch the podcast?

Josh Robb:
Oh, great question.

Austin Wilson:
It is a great question. It was a dark and stormy night, we were sitting around thinking, Hey, we got some knowledge, let’s get it out there and help some people.

Josh Robb:
I’ve been a fan of podcasts, I love listening to podcasts.

Austin Wilson:
Usually when you do the dishes.

Josh Robb:
Yes. Do the dishes, mow the lawn, any kind of chores, throw my earbuds in and listen away and it was pretty cool. We thought two different perspectives, you and I love hanging out, so it was great.

Austin Wilson:
We do. We do it a lot, we would sit down at the desk we’re sitting at a lot time to just talk about things going on. We’re like, you know what, this would be good for a client to hear.

Josh Robb:
The things we just talked about are the questions, a lot of times, the clients are asking me and I’d come to you and get your opinion and so that what if we took that and made it into something that was usable, hopefully for other people and add value.

Austin Wilson:
We did, we launched at the best time ever, January 2020.

Josh Robb:
That’s right.

Austin Wilson:
So we launched, had a cool party and got things rolling. Got a good start and then COVID hit and we continued to push our way through that. We recorded from home, we may only live three or four miles apart, but we were Zooming. That doesn’t mean we’re going quickly, that just meant we were using Zoom to record our podcast.

Josh Robb:
In fact we had to turn our cameras off sometimes because the internet was so slow, we were not Zooming very well.

Austin Wilson:
That’s great. So that is why we launched our podcast, we want to just help explain financial topics that might be complicated or scary to people in a very clear and concise way so that they can understand it as well as be entertaining. Because entertainment, you don’t want to listen to a podcast that’s boring.

Josh Robb:
Especially about finance.

[3:17] – Should You Fully Pay Off Debt or Pay the Balance Due & Increase Your Savings?

Austin Wilson:
So that is question number one. The next question, here we go Josh, this is good.

Josh Robb:
Yes. I’m ready.

Austin Wilson:
Is it better to completely pay off debt or pay the balance due and increase your savings?

Josh Robb:
Ooh, good question.

Austin Wilson:
That sounds a very good question.

Josh Robb:
Yes, now there’s a lot of variables in there.

Austin Wilson:
I was thinking there’s a couple ways we can talk about this.

Josh Robb:
Yes and one is interest rate really matters to answer that question, right? So if I have a credit card debt, that’s 18% interest rate, you better pay that off because I don’t think savings going to get you anywhere to offset what you’re incurring there.

Austin Wilson:
Another is what kind of debt.

Josh Robb:
Now if you have a mortgage of 3%, maybe you don’t pay extra on your mortgage and that also compares to the asset because that’s an appreciating asset long term versus a depreciating asset. So, to answer that question from a financial planner perspective, guess what? It depends.

Austin Wilson:
I know it’s one of those two answers.

Josh Robb:
I always am a firm believer in, you can do more than one goal at once, so if your goal is to pay down debt and to save for future goals, you can do both and you got to find that balance between the two. I would definitely say though, if it is a higher interest debt, there’s very hard to meet that hurdle of savings to keep up with that guaranteed amount of money that’s showing up on that other end.

Austin Wilson:
That’s where I am, it’s math question in my head is A, is it a depreciating or appreciating asset? So really the only kind of debt that I would view as on an appreciating asset is generally going to be your mortgage for most people and that is like we said, maybe not so bad, lower interest rates. Then you have a hurdle rate in my head of what can I expect to get out of my savings and I’m thinking investments and at a very high level you could say, am I potentially going to earn 8% in the market? If my interest rates over 8%, that’s just a no-no. You’re going to lose money overall.

Josh Robb:
Yep. The math doesn’t work.

Austin Wilson:
That’s at a very oversimplified high level, but two questions, is it appreciating or depreciating asset? Second question is the interest rate over what I can earn on what I’m saving. Yeah.

Josh Robb:
Then the third one would be what’s the timeframe?

Austin Wilson:
Absolutely.

Josh Robb:
So if it’s, I could have this done in a year, well then maybe you just knock that debt out and then get to savings. If it’s, this is going to take me 15 years then maybe it’s that combination of doing both along the way because timing matters too. If it’s a kind of a break, even on interest, you may say, okay, what’s the timeframe is being debt free worth wasting one year of not savings or something like that. So it’s a hard question to answer, but in general we’re not fans of debt and so we are fan of paying it down as quick as possible, but doing so with a plan and a purpose along with your other options and goals.

Austin Wilson:
Absolutely, Solomon said it well, the debtor is slave to the lender.

Josh Robb:
That’s true.

Austin Wilson:
So let us not be chained to our debt.

Josh Robb:
That’s right.

[6:09] – Should Married Couples Have Joint or Separate Bank Accounts?

Austin Wilson:
So here’s a good one and this one can go a lot of different ways too, which marriages last longer, this is a sticky question, those that have joint bank accounts or separate bank accounts?

Josh Robb:
That sounds like it was question asked maybe from an argument that happened in the past.

Austin Wilson:
It probably did, I think we probably both have opinions on this.

Josh Robb:
Yes. Well, I guess for me, it’s less to do with how the accounts are set up as how open and transparent you are with your money conversations because Austin, you and I both know that money issues are the leading cause for marital fights and divorce.

Austin Wilson:
It is, yep.

Josh Robb:
A lot of things drive down to money. I guess I really don’t care how your accounts are structured, if you have that open and honest communication and you’re both are on the same wavelength when it comes to your goals, your saving and your spending. That’s the key and then who cares how the accounts are set up? I’ve seen a lot of times too, especially if you’re later staged life and second marriage or not your first marriage that you come in with your own assets and you almost keep them separate because you’re really not even thinking for your benefit, but for the beneficiary’s benefit. Let’s say I’m 90 years old and my new spouse is 90 years old, and we have family already and these accumulated assets, instead of merging it all together, we each have our own state planning already figure it out, you just let it flow. Right? That’s an extreme example but the idea is there’s reasons for it to have all different types of account structures and all that but are you in agreement on the same page and the trust has to be there.

Austin Wilson:
Absolutely. Yeah, I mean, I think that communication is key, and I also think that when it comes to the level of knowledge or interest of how your own finances run, like different account structures may lend themselves to work better in that situation. So in my family, I work in finance, I kind of manage our household finances and my wife likes it that way, she knows enough to be dangerous, but not enough to get bogged down with details. So, for us, it works out very well to have joint accounts and everything’s super easy to find and super easy to navigate, it’s really worked for us because she doesn’t really care about all the details.

If you have someone who is in that boat where it’s not their forte, it’s not where they want to spend a lot of time in focus that could work. But there are a lot of people that it works, so to keep things separate different things are going different places but as long as you can trust, trust is huge because that is the downside to separate accounts, is there is an opportunity to not be on the same page if you choose not to be. So I guess it’s like knowing that conflict of interest up front, as long as you know it and take steps to just work through your accounts with each other and stuff like that, you’ll probably be okay.

Josh Robb:
Now on the other end is you see the joint account as being very open and transparent, but the downside is you both have a hundred percent access to it. So, the lack of trust on the other end is like, well, they could either person could take a hundred percent of that money out and rightly do so.

Austin Wilson:
There’s no secrets, so you can’t go shopping for your spouse, so I just have to say, yeah honey, it’s going to be on the credit card statement, I bought you something. Don’t look at that line from Amazon. So, to answer the question, it depends.

Josh Robb:
I’m going to have that answer a lot, it’s going to be good.

[9:21] – Should You Invest in Cryptocurrency?

Austin Wilson:
Here is a good one Josh, do you invest in cryptocurrency? Why or why not?

Josh Robb:
Oh, great question. I do have a little money in cryptocurrency and little being the relative turn there. A couple reasons why to answer that second question. So why is, one I wanted to know the experience so that I could speak about it, so when clients ask the question, whatever I’ve gone through the process of opening up a wallet, transferring money into the wallet, purchasing a digital currency, going through the whole thing so I would be aware of it.

Josh Robb:
Also it’s a new asset that is intriguing and I wanted to see what it was all about, but I approached it with the same way that I talked to my clients about is it’s risky, the SCC has not reg registered this as an investment vehicle, they do not monitor it nor is in any way shape kind of in our sphere yet. So I only put as much as I’m willing to lose in because I don’t want to take any risk on something that really doesn’t have much regulation at all.

Austin Wilson:
Well, and lately that’s been a lot of losing, so there’s not a lot of eggs in that basket right now. I’m in the same boat. I have some exposure; I try and keep it to a relatively low percentage of my total assets. A lot of my assets are in stocks way more than there is in cryptocurrency. I think that’s prudent, but I also like you, I thought that this is a new technology, this is a new asset class. It’s intriguing, I want to know how it works, I want to know the technology, I want to understand how it functions, so I was always intrigued by that. So yeah, I have some cryptocurrency, I tend to even avoid some of the more speculative. Cryptocurrency is speculative, but then there’s a lot of really small end cryptocurrencies that are even more speculative, so I tend to avoid some of the more speculative assets and lean into more of the well more well-known stuff just because it’s risky, but it’s a little bit less risky than even some of the new stuff that’s out there. So yes, that is a good question. So, Josh, here’s a doozy for you.

Josh Robb:
Oh boy.

[11:19] – If You Could Interview Any CEO, Who Would It Be?

Austin Wilson:
If you could interview any CEO, now it did not specify timeframe, who to be and why?

Josh Robb:
Ooh, that’s a great question. There’s some great CEOs out there that would be, like just kind of pick their brain on but I also think there’s some entertaining CEOs out there, if I’m talking to one, there’s some pretty dull ones out there that run a great business but they’re just going to be boring. So I think I’d lean towards the, I want to enjoy that interview-

Austin Wilson:
I kind of know where you’re going here.

Josh Robb:
Enjoy the interview and there’s a handful that are in kind of that boat, Elon Musk is one, I think it would be an interesting one because he just seems kind of out there with some of his stuff.

Austin Wilson:
But if we recorded in Ohio, he can’t smoke weed on the podcast and got to be a stipulation.

Josh Robb:
I think Richard Branson, who does Virgin Airlines he seems interesting and I think that would be an interesting one because he’s done a lot of different things, he’s doing the space thing, that would be one I think would be interesting.

Austin Wilson:
I personally, I was thinking, yeah Elon Musk would be fascinating because it would give us a million listeners overnight but I really think that I would love to dig in to the metaverse with Mark Zuckerberg. Zuckerberg is a controversial CEO, he’s obviously really wealthy and Facebook has got its own share of issues and has publicly for a long time but his push towards this metaverse focus is something that I find fascinating and it’s not really got a lot of traction yet, but I think it could be huge so I’d just love to dig into that a little bit… Zuck!

Josh Robb:
What about though, I thought you might have gone with the CEO of who’s that group that just bought the F1 and they’re in Miami now, the media.

Austin Wilson:
Liberty Media.

Josh Robb:
Liberty Media.

Austin Wilson:
That would have been good.

Josh Robb:
You’ll sit in a F1 car while you interview them.

Austin Wilson:
That would be- maybe next year. So, Liberty Media, they bought Formula 1 team a handful of years ago, they’ve really turned it around and made it very popular in the US through a partnership with Netflix with drive to survive. They just had the in inaugural Grand Prix in Miami and I watched it live.

Josh Robb:
I bet you did.

Austin Wilson:
Because it’s actually in my time zone for once and it was a great race and obviously my driver won and my team won, so I’m really happy but the Formula 1 is growing in the United States.

Josh Robb:
There’s celebrities there, it was pretty popular.

Austin Wilson:
I mean like Michael Jordan was there, everyone was there, Serena and Venus Williams were there, I mean it was the who’s who of the sports was there.

Josh Robb:
And entertainment.

Austin Wilson:
Tom Brady was there. So, it was pretty cool. That is not what we’re talking about today.

Josh Robb:
No, I thought that would be a good one.

[13:59] – How Do I Simplify My Life?

Austin Wilson:
But, if you did want to learn more about Formula 1, We have an episode about the economics of Formula 1, so check that out. All right Josh, here’s another one. This is a little bit more about life. I want to simplify my life; how do I do that?

Josh Robb:
Okay how do you simplify your life? Do not have kids, that’s the first one. The key to that in my opinion is setting up the framework for the why, because then you can eliminate the things that are not helping you get there. So I always talk about having goals, we’re talking about finance, having goals, that’s the why piece and so if you want to simplify your life, there’s a lot of things you probably do and are time consuming that maybe aren’t helping you get to that end point and that’s to me how you simplify it.

Josh Robb:
Now if you’re just talking straight finances, just like it’s everywhere, find tools that help you with that, there’s a lot of technology out there to really reduce, we’ve talked about, there’s those aggregating things like mint.com or anything like that, where they can help you get all the stuff you need in one spot, a lot easier. Simplification really comes down to understanding the why and if it’s not within that track, you kind of can push it off this side and focus more in on what you need to get to that end spot.

Austin Wilson:
My thoughts on that is embrace saying no, because there are more things to do and good things even then you can do at least do well and especially as you add kids and a spouse and all that and a house to the equation that kind of rhyme is that the write a book.

Josh Robb:
Two dogs.

Austin Wilson:
Yeah two dogs, you add all this stuff to the equation and you have less and less availability to do everything well, you only have a hundred percent of you, you’ve given a lot of it at work, you got to be able to do everything else well, and your family needs to be a priority. So being willing, not only able, everyone’s able, but being willing to say no to even good things is really key. If you just have a week where you have too much say no to doing something on Saturday, take the day to be with your family and recharge and that’s the way to simplify your life. All right here’s another one, what’s the most important thing to you in your life?

[16:02] – What’s The Most Important Thing in Josh & Austin’s Life?

 

Josh Robb:
Go ahead, you go first. I’ve been answering all these, you got it.

Austin Wilson:
I would say this is where I have higher level thoughts of my faith, my faith in Jesus Christ is my most important thing in my life and it’s impacted everything and who I am as well as how I live my life and lead my family. So that’s where I would say is the most important and it directly relates to everything I do.

Josh Robb:
Mine starts faith and then family and you cover that really well, I mean that direction drives who I am and then the family is second there and that then drives, talk about simplifying, that drives to that piece of, those are the priorities, do I have enough time to do those well? That’s the key, those are the top priorities.


[16:51] – What’s The Best Finance Principle You Can Teach Your Kids?

Austin Wilson:
We are on the same page there. Josh what is the best principle that you can teach your kids?

Josh Robb:
Ooh and we’re just talking finance? I took this as a finance question.

Austin Wilson:
That seems good.

Josh Robb:
So that’s where I’m going to go with this because there’s a lot of things you can do.

Austin Wilson:
Go where I think you’re going.

Josh Robb:
I think for kids, if we’re talking finance principles, creating positive habits is the key, the first of which is creating that idea of saving versus spending. The delayed gratification, that to me is huge is that there’s nothing wrong with buying things and there’s nothing wrong with having cool stuff but the idea of weighing it versus what else you could use it for is huge. Teaching them the principle of delayed gratification is huge because in today’s timeframe, when we got streaming, you have your phone, everything’s instant, so to be able to teach the kids that, Hey, you can create the habits to get a bigger goal if you can say no, like go back to saying no, say no to those things of the right now. What about you?

Austin Wilson:
Compounding, if young people understood the power-

Josh Robb:
Oh, that’s huge.

Austin Wilson:
They would change the way they live their financial life, I truly believe that and I think it goes back to education. You’re only going to know the power of compounding if you are taught it because sadly, at least as of right now it’s not a mainstream educational topic. I think that if people really understood the power of compounding, they would save more and spend less, they would view debt differently because they’d say, well I shouldn’t take on all this extra debt because I need to be saving some money and it would just change the way that they think of every aspect of their financial life. So just education of compounding is where I would go.

[18:37] – What Did Josh & Austin Want to Be As Kids?

Austin Wilson:
What did you want to be, Josh, when you were a kid?

Josh Robb:
I went through phases, all different kind of the normal, I think kid stuff of like, “Ooh an astronaut sounds cool”, going into space. Not too late for a long period of time, baseball was huge in my life, and it was like, man, I want to be a pitcher, a major league baseball pitcher, still do but I think I’m on the tail end of that side thing. They’re not getting a lot of 39-year-old pitchers joining, but for the later ages and this wasn’t a career, but it was more of what I wanted to do when I grew up was be a coach. I get to do that as a dad, with my kids, which is fun most of the time, depending on the age group sometimes it’s more herding cats than it is coaching.

Josh Robb:
That’s the enjoyable, I also got the opportunity to coach a high school level, which was really rewarding to have kids who were good at the sport, who were passionate about the sport and they were looking to you to help them kind of move up to that next level.

Austin Wilson:
When you were in shape back then, because you were running-

Josh Robb:
And I was in shape, that was very helpful for me to be in shape for that too kept me in shape but coaching, I would say at that later stage, it’s something that I’ve even been able to do was coach. What about you Austin?

Austin Wilson:
I went through phases as well. I remember when I was a little I wanted to be a football player, I got to do that in junior high and high school and it was cool, but it wasn’t ever anything I made money at, I guess I technically was kind of pseudo grown up at that point in my little kid’s mind. I wanted to be a helicopter pilot at one point too, I never really gained an traction either and actually I wanted to get into finance at a relatively young age, so I was able to do that.

Josh Robb:
There you go.

[20:20] – Can You Start Saving at 50 & Still Retire?

Austin Wilson:
So that worked out pretty well. All right here’s a good one for you Josh, can you start saving at age 50 and still retire?

Josh Robb:
Sure.

Austin Wilson:
When we previewed this question, we laughed because we said, yep, if you want to retire at 80 or 90 man, you’re all set.

Josh Robb:
Now I always say this as a half joke but it’s true, anybody can retire at any point in time, it just you may not like what that lifestyle leads but yes, you can start saving at 50 and still retire. If you’re somebody who had been working and just hadn’t been able to save, you had hopefully been accruing social security benefits along the way or there’s opportunity, but the thing is that yes you can. Starting at any point in time is great but it would just mean adjusting your timeframe, you can’t start from scratch at 50 and retire at 55 probably unless you’re earning a ton of money… So yes you can.

Austin Wilson:
I would just piggyback on that and kind of build on what I was already talking about with what you will have to do if you start a little bit later in life is put more of your own dollars in, your dollars have had less time to compound and grow into more dollars. So you’re putting more of your actual money to work instead of the less dollar amount of that has grown on its own, so just playing a little bit of catch up, you’re going to have to put more money to work to meet those goals, but like you said, if you can put enough money away you can make it happen.

Josh Robb:
Yes and I mean the government acknowledges that and that they allow for catch up contributions after age 50 and that they increase the amount that someone over 50 can add to retirement accounts.

Austin Wilson:
So is that like a buying Hines stock?

Josh Robb:
Yes, it’s not mustard, but it’s ketchup contributions, but the idea there is they acknowledge that you’re probably in higher earning years, have a little more cash flow and you’re probably looking to kind of enhance your savings ability because you’re getting closer to that retirement. So there are opportunities there where actually will help you save more through those benefits.

Austin Wilson:
All right two more questions Josh.

Josh Robb:
All right.

Austin Wilson:
What financial decision are you most proud of?

Josh Robb:
Financial decision that I’m most proud of is, I would say starting saving early, right after college, I’d open up a Roth IRA, put as much money as I could in there, I wish I could have done more. Always looking back on the compounding which Austin told me about, of course but starting that habit was key and so I can look back on that and say I’m glad I at least started that habit.

Austin Wilson:
I would say that, I don’t know it’s kind of a more recent one, but I refinanced when mortgage rates were at the valley of COVID and I got a really good rate and a really good term and it makes me never want to move. So when I look at mortgage rates, interest rates all the time, I’m like, ha-ha that’s why I refinanced, it was literally within weeks of the bottom, so that was pretty fun. Not always going to time it that well, but it worked out that time.

Josh Robb:
There you go.

[23:18] – Dad Joke of the Week

Austin Wilson:
The dad joke of the week, a little late and I’m going to say that, shout out to Cooper McKenna, I heard this at church yesterday morning.

Josh Robb:
Okay, I’m ready.

Austin Wilson:
All right knock-knock.

Josh Robb:
Who’s there?

Austin Wilson:
Ah.

Josh Robb:
Ah who?

Austin Wilson:
Bless you.

Josh Robb:
Oh, there you go.

Austin Wilson:
Ha classic.

Josh Robb:
I love it.

[23:32] – If Josh & Austin Had to Write a Fiction Book, What Would The Plot Be?

Austin Wilson:
All right. Last but not least josh, if you had to write a fiction book what would be the main plot?

Josh Robb:
Ooh, that’s good. I mean, there’s so many good books out there that you feel like what plots are still out there.

Austin Wilson:
Yeah, are you going to rob what’s out there already?

Josh Robb:
I enjoy a series where the main character progresses through and so you look at some of those long multi-book series where you’re following the same character through events and I love those continuation stories. If I was to write a book, being a dad, maybe like a dad and kids adventure of some sort, I think that would be cool. Their plane crashes and they’re trying to survive and waiting for rescue and the adventures that ensue there or something like that.

Austin Wilson:
That’s pretty cool.

Josh Robb:
Like the Swiss family Robinson type of thing… See they already did it. Ah too late, already did it.

Austin Wilson:
Man, not again.

Josh Robb:
I think that would be fun. What about you Austin?

Austin Wilson:
I would say, I think a superhero book about or not a book, I guess it could be a book, we’re talking about a book I was thinking movie, but yeah, a superhero with special needs I think would be sweet because as some of our listeners may know, I have a daughter with special needs and I just want her to know that she can do anything that she wants to and that she sets her mind too. So I think a superhero with special needs would be the coolest plot ever.

Josh Robb:
Now I will say, it’s a cartoon, but I think they’re doing a lot better job of incorporating it in more and more of those things. So Paw Patrol has a dog now that is in a wheelchair, it’s back legs were hurt or whatever and so I think which again, going back to who’s watching Paw Patrol, I mean, besides me, who’s it targeted towards is kids, it’s for them to see things like that incorporated into there is great.

Austin Wilson:
That’s cool. So Josh that is the first episode of a new series, which will hopefully be continuing of questions from listeners.

Josh Robb:
That’s right.

Austin Wilson:
So how can our listeners help us to continue to grow this podcast?

Josh Robb:
Well make sure you share it with your friends, if one of these questions were asked is something that they may be asking themselves, share this episode with them, make sure you subscribe that way every Thursday you get our newest episode sent straight to your listening device and leave us a review on whatever podcasting listening platform you use. It’s always great, we appreciate it, it makes more people find us when they’re searching.

Austin Wilson:
The most important one that we mentioned earlier, but we’re going to mention it again is email us any ideas, any questions, any thoughts you have to hello@theinvesteddads.com. Like I said, we read everyone and we will definitely do another one of these episodes where we are answering your questions so that we are talking about what you want us to talk about.

Josh Robb:
All right.

Austin Wilson:
All right well until next Thursday, have a great week.

Josh Robb:
All right talk to you later.

Austin Wilson:
Bye.

Thank you for listening to the Invested Dads podcast. This episode has ended, but your journey towards a better financial future doesn’t have to, head over to the investeddads.com to access all the links and resources mentioned in today’s show. If you enjoyed this episode and we had a positive impact on your life, leave us a review, click subscribe, and don’t miss the next episode.

Josh Robb and Austin Wilson work for Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. All opinions expressed by Josh, Austin or any podcast guest are solely their own opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. This podcast is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon for investment decisions. Clients of Hixon, Zuercher Capital Management may maintain positions in the securities discussed in this podcast. There is no guarantee that the statements, opinions, or forecasts provided here in will prove to be correct. Past performance may not be indicative of future results, indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses, which would reduce returns. Securities investing involves risk, including the potential for loss of principle. There is no assurance that any investment plan or strategy will be successful.