211: 8 Ways to Achieve Financial Peace

Join Josh and Austin as they uncover 8 ways to achieve financial peace. The guys share practical tips and actionable advice designed to help you navigate your financial journey with confidence and ease. From the basics to smart tactics to manage your money, this episode is packed with insights that will change your approach to financial planning!

 

Main Talking Points

[1:43] – Living Below Your Means
[3:35] – Managing Your Debt
[6:09] – Getting Financially Educated
[8:05] – Building Up Your Emergency Fund
[12:30] – Dad Joke of the Week
[14:43] – Insurance Coverage
[19:06] – Reviewing Your Finances
[20:12] – Practicing Patience & Discipline
[21:41] – Having Contentment

 

Links & Resources

Full Transcript

Welcome to The Invested Dads podcast. Simplifying financial topics so that you can take action and make your financial situation better. Helping you to understand the current world of financial planning and investments, here are your hosts, Josh Robb and Austin Wilson.

Austin Wilson:

All right. Hey, hey. Welcome back to the Invested Dads Podcast, a podcast where we take you on a journey to better your financial future. I’m Austin Wilson, Co-Portfolio Manager at Hixon Zuercher Capital Management.

Josh Robb:

And I’m Josh Robb, Director of Wealth Management at Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. Austin, how can people help us with our podcast?

Austin Wilson:

Please subscribe. If you’re not subscribed, hit that plus, follow, whatever that icon is on your podcast player, hit it, so you get new episodes when they drop on Thursdays. And it’d be great if you’d leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify if we’ve helped you out so hopefully, we can be found and help out more people who listen to this podcast. Also, always remember that you can email us at hello@theinvesteddads.com with any questions, with any ideas, or through our website at theinvesteddads.com. All right, Josh.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

Today.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

We’re going to be talking about how to achieve financial peace.

Josh Robb:

Peace. Oh yeah, peace sounds restful.

Austin Wilson:

Peace, man.

Josh Robb:

Sounds tranquil.

Austin Wilson:

Sounds like a great place to be. Peaceful.

Josh Robb:

Yeah, so-

Austin Wilson:

Calm. Got that peaceful, easy feeling.

Josh Robb:

There is no one way to get there, but I’m going to give eight suggestions.

Austin Wilson:

I’m surprised you landed on the number eight.

Josh Robb:

Eight was a good one.

Austin Wilson:

It’s not like five or two.

Josh Robb:

Well, I have one bonus.

Austin Wilson:

Eight, the bonus.

Josh Robb:

You know how it goes. But these are tips, suggestions, and encouragement to help you get along the road to financial peace, all right?

Austin Wilson:

Along the road to peace. All right, hit us off.

 

[1:43] – Living Below Your Means 

Josh Robb:

All right, so the first one is live below your means.

Austin Wilson:

Wait, wait, wait, wait. The step one could be as simple as live on less than you bring in.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Oh, wow.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

That doesn’t seem so bad.

Josh Robb:

And you’re going to find a lot of these, they’re not rocket scientists, not crazy, but when we get to the end, my last point will drive it home.

Austin Wilson:

Okay.

Josh Robb:

But live below you means. So to do that, create a budget, get an understanding of cash flow. We’ve talked about this in some other podcasts. But the idea is that first, find out how much you’re spending, how much your obligations are, and make sure that that total spending is below your income that’s coming in. To do that, it really helps relieve the stress point when you have the shortfalls and you’re like, Hey, can I borrow some money for gas until I get paid next week? Because I ran out of money, right? You don’t want to be in that point.

Peace. If you think about that, that’s this removal of anxiety, right? That’s where you’re sitting. And if you can be aware of your cash flow, that will relieve that stress point. So live below your means, step one.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah. And we would say when you’re looking at creating a budget, which is make sure, yeah, you got your money coming in, your money going out, making sure that you know where everything’s going. A good place to start, we like to say is the 50/30.20 rule for your budget.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

So keep it simple. You got 50% going towards all your needs. These are all your needs.

Josh Robb:

Things you need to do.

Austin Wilson:

Things you need to do. You got 30%, you can go do something you want. That’s out to eat, maybe that’s go out on a trip, maybe that’s X, Y, Z. But that’s not necessary for a living, just for fun. And then you got 20%, which we would say hopefully investing for your future, but this could also be where you’d put debt payments in there because obviously, we’d like people to avoid unnecessary debt as much as possible. So, yeah, and that leads us right to our next point, Josh-

 

[3:35] – Managing Your Debt 

Josh Robb:

Which is managing your debt.

Austin Wilson:

Manage your debt.

Josh Robb:

So again, this is all about financial peace. We’re not talking about how to become a millionaire. This is about how do I have less stress and anxiety about my money issues. So first, you’re living below your means, which means you have excess cash at the end of your month for what you’re bringing in. So what do you do with that extra cash? One of which is making sure you have one, a good handle on your debt.

Austin Wilson:

Oh, yeah.

Josh Robb:

I have met with people who aren’t even really sure how much they owe, where they’re at, and all that. And that’s a scary thing, right? But people have debt. We know people come out, they have credit card debt, they have student loan debt, they have car loans, they have mortgages-

Austin Wilson:

Equity.

Josh Robb:

There’s a lot of debt out there. And again, we’ve talked about this. Debt isn’t necessarily a bad thing, especially when it’s tied to something that is appreciating like a home. So like a home mortgage is something that you got to make sure you’re being a good steward of that and also understand how much you can afford. But there’s certain debts that aren’t as bad as others. Now, credit card debt with a 20-some percent interest rate-

Austin Wilson:

That’s not good enough.

Josh Robb:

Not a good debt. But the idea is how do I manage this debt? How do I prioritize paying this off? Because again, not all debt is bad, how do I make sure my payments are reasonable and not causing any disruption somewhere else in my overall budget?

Austin Wilson:

And we’ve talked a couple different ways that that can be done when you’re looking at debt. So obviously getting an understanding of the list of all the debts you have is step number one, right?

Josh Robb:

Yes. Yep.

Austin Wilson:

You get that figured out. Ideally, you can have what your balances are, what your payments are, and the interest rates on all of them-

Josh Robb:

In the timeframe.

Austin Wilson:

In the timeframe. And then you’ve got a couple options of which way you can attack those things. A couple very popular ones are both related to snow as we’re-

Josh Robb:

For whatever reason.

Austin Wilson:

Not in the winter anymore. But one is the snowball method. That would be what Dave Ramsey would say is to get those little debts knocked out first, pay the minimums on the other, and work your way up the payment ladder, up the balance ladder until they’re gone. The other would be interest rate-wise. That’d be the avalanche method where you pay the higher interest rate one down and work your way down that way. So a couple different ways to do that. But both have been proven effective if you stick to the plan, right?

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

sticking to the planski, knowing your debts is a very important there. But yeah, good point.

Josh Robb:

And you can always consolidate. Sometimes bringing things together, especially if there’s somebody’s offering, maybe some sort of intro lower rate, those type of things. Yeah, you can get things all into the lowest interest-rate debt you can. That’s sometimes helpful.

 

[6:09] – Getting Financially Educated 

Josh Robb:

Here’s the third one, and this one I think is important, is financial education. And so I think it’s important to grow and learn more, especially when it comes to finances. So just reading, researching, learning, watching videos, getting to the point, the more you know, the less uncertainty and anxiety you could face. So when you think about, this is true for a lot of things. If you’re stressed about your physical health, learning more about how food affects your body, learning more about how exercise improves things and which ones are better than others, the more you know, the better you feel.

And the same is true here is, if I can understand personal finance and have a better and a more comfortable positioning on knowledge, then the actions become easier. You have less uncertainty, which means more peace.

Austin Wilson:

Yep. I would say a couple of places to start there when you’re obviously, most people today have social media follow, I would say reputable, solid, head on their shoulders, financial people. There’s a lot of good stuff out there. I would also say there’s a lot of garbage out there.

Josh Robb:

Yes, be careful who you listen to.

Austin Wilson:

Anyone who’s saying you can get rich quick is probably yanking your chain. And there’s a lot of people talking about, oh, real estate investing is the only answer. There’s no risk ever. They’re lying to you as well. Be careful what you listen to. There’s a lot of good things, but also a lot of bad things out there. But read blogs, listen to podcasts. Hey, guess what? Plug here, Invested Dad’s Podcast.

Josh Robb:

Oh, that’d be a good podcast.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah, we hope to help you out a little bit with some of these things. But what’s Warren Buffett say he does all day?

Josh Robb:

Reads.

Austin Wilson:

He reads.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

He reads about the stock market and the economy and companies and news and forms a well-rounded opinion. And that’s helped him to be successful at making his business run. And he obviously manages a lot of money there and has done pretty well. So just read all the time is what I would say.

 

[8:05] – Building Up Your Emergency Fund

Josh Robb:

Yep. And the fourth one before we take our break is again, we’re talking peace. How do I get that peace of mind when it comes to finances is having an emergency fund. We’ve hit on this in a couple of different podcasts. This is very important. It’s in fact one of the first things I encourage people to do coming right out of high school is build up a little bit of savings to cover when an emergency happens. Not if, when an emergency happens because it’s going to happen. They’re going to get a flat tire, something’s going to happen and you’re going to need some cash to fix and get back on track.

Austin Wilson:

See, because what happens is those unexpected events happen. Could be an emergency room visit, could be you need $1,000 work done on your car, you need an X, Y, Z. Those things are not planned for, so therefore they’re not necessarily going to be built into your budget that we already talked about.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

You don’t know that you’re going to have a flat tire ahead of time, so you did not set $200.

Josh Robb:

Now if you can plan for that and have it on your calendar-

Austin Wilson:

That’s great. Tell me how.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

So that’s exactly what that would be. So then you’d pull that couple hundred dollars out of your emergency fund into your checking account, you get it paid for, it’s done. And then over the next couple weeks, couple months, whatever, you just backfill that emergency fund back to where it was. And it’s like it never happened. But you didn’t go into a financial situation where you put a couple hundred dollars or a couple thousand dollars on a credit card, you can’t pay off anyway.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

So yeah, that’s what that’s for.

Josh Robb:

And the emergency fund is, again, it’s a peace of mind because I have some people that, well, should I invest that? What should I do with it? No, it’s there for an emergency, it’s there for peace. It’s not going to do well. It’s going to sit there in cash doing hardly anything. But the point is, it’s not there to grow and be this great investment, it’s there for peace of mind. It’s help.

Austin Wilson:

And how much would you recommend, Josh?

Josh Robb:

So the norm for an emergency fund is three to six months of living expenses. So your needs. Not three to six months of income, it’s three to six months of your living expenses.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah. So look at your shelter costs, your transportation costs, your food costs, insurance-

Josh Robb:

Tend to your essentials-

Austin Wilson:

The basics

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Cover three to six months of-

Josh Robb:

If I just need to get by, what do I need? And the reason why there’s three to six months of range is it really all depends on one, the likelihood that you’ll need that full amount, which is a big one. And then two, how long you think you’ll need that? So those two, for instance, if you have joint income, so if it’s you and somebody else together sharing expenses, whether you have a roommate or a spouse or whatever, that would be a reason why you could have the shorter end. Because if you lose your job, somebody else still has income so you didn’t go to zero.

Austin Wilson:

Right.

Josh Robb:

And the other piece of it is how long. So let’s say I’m in an industry or a job where there’s just not a lot of those around. And so if I lose my job, it may take me a little while to find one. Or in the opposite, if I at a job that’s just highly employable, that if I lose my job, I could go out and then within a couple of days get a good offer and be back at work, then I could again shorten up my emergency fund. But three to six months is kind of the norm. Anywhere in there.

It’s really, again, comes back to this peace talk is wherever it gives you the most peace of mind, that’s your number. If you say, you know what, I could probably get by with three, but I feel better with six, guess what your emergency fund should be? Six.

Austin Wilson:

And I would recommend put your emergency fund in a high-yield savings account that you don’t have regular access to see every day. Something online.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

And you’re probably going to be getting almost 5% right now.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

That’s not a bad place to be sitting right now.

Josh Robb:

No. But like I said, it’s not there to grow. So don’t try to find something to get more growth.

Austin Wilson:

No, don’t take risk.

Josh Robb:

Yes, no risk.

Austin Wilson:

Don’t take risk. But nowadays with cash, you can get almost 5%, which is really handy.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

I’ve always thought about this. So if you lose your job, highly employable or not highly employable, be willing to go work at freaking McDonald’s in the meantime-

Josh Robb:

Get some income.

Austin Wilson:

So that you can bleed off that a lot less. So even if you need to pick up 15 hours-

Josh Robb:

Deliver pizzas, whatever you need to-

Austin Wilson:

Whatever it takes. People sometimes when this happens, and I’ve heard about this happening, they’re so unwilling to work below their qualification level then that they just bleed out money for a while where you can stunt that a little bit for a while.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. Doesn’t mean you have to stay there forever.

Austin Wilson:

No, just while you’re interviewing for those other jobs, have some money coming in. Right now, you can make $15 an hour at McDonald’s or Chick-fil-A.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. There you go.

 

[12:30] – Dad Joke of the Week 

Austin Wilson:

So it’s not such a bad place to be. All right, so dad joke of the week. Let’s take a break.

Josh Robb:

I’m ready. Yes.

Austin Wilson:

Josh, Halloween’s coming up.

Josh Robb:

Okay. A little bit from now, yeah. Depending on when you listen to this podcast, it could be tomorrow.

Austin Wilson:

Or it just happened, it depends on when you listen to it. Skeletons.

Josh Robb:

Skeletons.

Austin Wilson:

Have you seen those giant skeletons on South Main?

Josh Robb:

Not only there. We were on a trip-

Austin Wilson:

Giant. They’re like 10 feet, 12 feet tall.

Josh Robb:

But we were on a trip, we were going to a volleyball tournament. So I’m an hour from here and I drive by one. So it’s not just here, they’re around. What is this?

Austin Wilson:

I don’t understand what the purpose… They’re huge. They’re like 10-plus feet tall.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

There are a couple of them on South Main because that’s the area we live. And my wife and I, we walk in the neighborhood with our kids and it’s a lot of fun. But around that Halloween time of year, you see those things and we were like, wow, that’s a commitment to Halloween decorations. So then we decided, I wonder what a 12-foot tall skeleton costs? Those things are like $800 a piece.

Josh Robb:

Wow, that’s crazy.

Austin Wilson:

So these people have got all these steps out of the way. If they spending $800 of one skeleton, much less two.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

So anyway, that’s only partially relating to my dad joke.

Josh Robb:

Okay.

Austin Wilson:

But that’s an interesting thing about Finley, Ohio, it’s the big skeleton.

Josh Robb:

I drove by one-

Austin Wilson:

Or somewhere else.

Josh Robb:

I drove by it in February. It was out.

Austin Wilson:

Did they have it decorated?

Josh Robb:

I don’t know-

Austin Wilson:

For Christmas or some-

Josh Robb:

I don’t know know what it was. It was just out there. Giant skeleton in February just hanging out.

Austin Wilson:

So, Josh, skeletons. Why wouldn’t a pair of skeletons fight each other?

Josh Robb:

I feel like it has to do with them not having any guts.

Austin Wilson:

Ah, that’s exactly right. So dad jokes come very naturally to Joshua.

Josh Robb:

Uh-huh. It just seems like they don’t have guts.

Austin Wilson:

It just makes sense. That’s a good one. All right, we got four more and a bonus.

Josh Robb:

Follow that up.

Austin Wilson:

Ooh.

Josh Robb:

My kids, they just had a school dance. Do you know why the ghost didn’t go to the school dance?

Austin Wilson:

No.

Josh Robb:

He had no body to go with.

Austin Wilson:

No body to go with.

Josh Robb:

He’s a ghost.

Austin Wilson:

That’s a good one. He’s a ghost. All right, four more plus a bonus because Josh likes to make us have some odd numbers here.

Josh Robb:

Well, you got to have even numbers, but then you can throw a bonus in, it doesn’t count.

Austin Wilson:

You had an odd number.

Josh Robb:

Yes. So that’s how it works. All right, so peace of mind. Again, that’s what we’re talking about.

Austin Wilson:

Peace of mind.

 

[14:43] – Insurance Coverage 

Josh Robb:

How do I go through life with minimal anxiety for finances? Insurance.

Austin Wilson:

Ooh.

Josh Robb:

Insurance coverage. Because is designed exactly for that. To help pass the burden from you to somebody else or a company for them to take on the anxiety, stress and what if of a future possible event.

Austin Wilson:

Yep.

Josh Robb:

So what am I talking about? Life insurance. So life insurance is there. If something tragically happens to you, that income, a big lump sum will come to somebody to help them when you are no longer there.

Austin Wilson:

True.

Josh Robb:

Car insurance, same thing.

Austin Wilson:

Time out.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

Life insurance.

Josh Robb:

Life insurance, yes.

Austin Wilson:

99.9999999% of the time, term insurance is most appropriate for most people.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

I left it open for the 0.00000001, but 99 point all those nines, you need term insurance.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. If we’re talking coverage for life insurance-

Austin Wilson:

That’s insurance.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. Coverage for a death.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah.

Josh Robb:

Yes, term insurance is the cheapest way to get the most coverage without overpaying for all the other things.

Austin Wilson:

Insurance is not an investment.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. There are whole other reasons for other things, but you’re right. If somebody’s just saying, I need coverage for a death benefit, you’re right, term insurance is the best way.

Austin Wilson:

And when you’re young, in your 20s, you can get term insurance 30 years… you do pay for it, but it is so cheap.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. Well, the cheapest one will be if your company offers any kind of insurance. That’s usually at a highly discounted rate or sometimes even included in some sort of benefits package. So then car insurance, home insurance, property insurance, all those things are there. Just what if there’s a big storm and it knocks down the side of my house, all those things? You’re taking the stress and passing it over to a company who says if I get a bunch of people, they’ll pay me monthly, I’ll have enough cash flows that if some of these happen, but not all of them, I’m okay. Right?

Austin Wilson:

Mm-hmm-

Josh Robb:

What does it do to you though is, gives you the peace of mind that if something happens, I have some coverage to help me get back to where I was. Umbrella insurance. So this is one we don’t talk a lot about, but an umbrella insurance policy is an additional peace of mind. What it is, if you think of it in layers is you have your insurance to cover your property or your car, your home, those things. And then this umbrella is over top. Like an umbrella covers, right? And so if something happens and your coverage isn’t enough, your coverage kicks in on top of that to then extend your coverage beyond that.

So for instance, if you have a car insurance, and let’s say it has a $500,000 policy if you’re responsible… and I’m really simplifying this because there’s all different things within there, but let’s just simplify. I’m in a car crash, I’m responsible and there’s a lawsuit on me and it’s a million dollars. Well, my car insurance covers 500,000, but I’m now responsible for the rest. If I have an umbrella policy, it kicks in after the car insurance covers its amount, it’ll cover the rest up until whatever that insurance policy is.

So again, just an additional peace of mind. Umbrella insurance is not expensive. And we always say, really, you should have an umbrella insurance around your net worth. That’s really kind of an easy rule of thumb. Look at your total net worth and your umbrella insurance should be right around there.

Austin Wilson:

Yep. And a pro-tip is for things like… so insurance costs can sneak up on you if you’re not prepared for them. So things like property insurance. You know what that’s going to be roughly every year if it’s not built into your mortgage payment already. Things like car insurance, you kind of know what that’s going to be as well. So what you should do is self accrue for those things. So take one 12th of your amount-

Josh Robb:

If you’re not paying monthly.

Austin Wilson:

If you’re not paying monthly, take one 12th of that amount, put it in a savings account, charge that savings account for it when it’s due and you’ll never have an issue again. Automatically inflate that by the way, every year or so because it’s going to go up in cost. But otherwise, you’re going to get hit. You could get hit with a $1,500, $2,000 property insurance bill and you’re like, oh man, I just was so set on where we were headed for the month. Got to pay $2,000. So that’s the way I would do that.

Josh Robb:

All right. And along with that, you mentioned it increasing over time. Review your insurance coverage because you want a peace of mind to know I’m covered today, not five years ago when I set this up. So periodically review all your coverage and make sure it’s still adequate for what you have and the cost of what it would be to replace it.

 

[19:06] – Reviewing Your Finances 

Austin Wilson:

That kind of leads right into our next point. Number six, Josh, regularly review all your finances. Not just your insurance, but insurance is a part of that.

Josh Robb:

Yep. And this comes down to just being mindful and aware of your situation.

Austin Wilson:

Right.

Josh Robb:

And we talk about this and I’m a fan of it, setting it up and forgetting about it when it comes to making your contributions all those things, automate it all but be aware, know what’s going on. For instance, if I’m maxing out my Roth IRA, a couple of years ago, the max amount was $6,000. Great. If I’m not reviewing periodically and looking at that, when it comes to this year, I’m not putting the max anymore because they’ve increased it over time.

And so those are the things we’re talking about is, you need to review. And it doesn’t need to be a daily thing. Twice a year, just do a quick look, how’s everything going? Am I doing everything I need to do? Review your insurance policies while you’re at it. Look at your statements. Is everything invested the right way it needs to be. Because again, it’s not rocket science. If you’re setting up your situation getting to that point, you should just make sure, am I still doing everything it needs to do? Anything change that I need to be aware of?

Austin Wilson:

Absolutely.

 

[20:12] – Practicing Patience & Discipline 

Josh Robb:

And along with that is practicing patience and discipline. So I talked about the set it and forget it when it came to adding money into your accounts. Discipline matters. And that’s a financial habit that will really help give you the financial piece is if I know I’m doing everything I need to do and I build up that habit, I feel fine. I feel better about it. And patience matters. Because we know investing, it’s a compounding, it’s a long-term game.

And the key to that is your money’s compounding right now, but the compounding now versus 40 years from now, there’s going to be a difference in dollars because if it compounds at 10% now and you have $10,000 and it compounds at 10% and you have $10 million, there’s a little bit difference in dollars that are coming in.

Austin Wilson:

It’s interesting. So when you’re just starting out with investing specifically, you’re in your early 20s, you got your first job or whatever that looks like, you’re putting in very few dollars. And when the market moves 10%, it’s ultimately moving only a couple dollars. It’s not even hardly moving your statement. And it’s like, oh, this is so boring. This is so boring. Goodness gracious though, you get 15 years into your career and you’ve got some actual money and you actually start seeing, wow-

Josh Robb:

That made a difference.

Austin Wilson:

When things move, my dollars move. And imagine what that looks like when you’re 20 or 30 years into your career. It’s really, that’s the power of compounding and why it’s so important to be doing it always… early and often is what we say, right?

 

[21:41] – Having Contentment 

Josh Robb:

Yep. Patience, discipline. We’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, get a plan and stick to it. That’s really the key. So finally, number eight, the last before the bonus thing I have, and this is sums it all up-

Austin Wilson:

Yep.

Josh Robb:

Contentment.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah.

Josh Robb:

You will not experience peace if you’re not content.

Austin Wilson:

True.

Josh Robb:

And content doesn’t mean you’re not driven to try to improve where you are or get promotions and all that stuff, contentment is really just being satisfied and happy with where you’re at in along the way. It’s not just trying to reach the goal. This is a journey, right? It’s not just getting to that destination, it’s being mindful and aware along the way to say, Hey, you know what, I’m okay with where I’m at. I’m happy. I know I’m not where I want to be, but I’m going to get there. I have the discipline, I have the patience. I’m doing everything I need to do, and I’m going to enjoy the ride along the way.

Austin Wilson:

And what that means is being content and happy with the things that you have for longer. Because to really succeed financially, your life’s going to look different than other people around you. Other people around you are going to be constantly moving and buying a giant new house and buying a new car all the time and just lifestyle inflation all the time. Because what we’re told to do.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

That’s what culture wants us to do, it’s what marketing is designed for us to do. We can actually benefit from that by holding stocks and companies that are profiting on that.

Josh Robb:

For sure.

Austin Wilson:

But we ourselves need to look at this and say, yeah, I’m okay. I’m cool with what I got. I can actually focus on being a present dad and husband, a good employee and friend, and focus on people, focus on experiences, focus on doing things and creating memories rather than buying a new trinket here and there, right?

Josh Robb:

For sure. And that’s really what it comes back to for this whole thing is just we talked to the very first one, living below your means, right? That’s the contentment of just saying, I don’t need to have all the newest, brightest things because that’s going to eat up my budget and make it harder. So I’m a huge fan of that. I think that applies to a lot of places in life, not just financial piece, but that is what we’re talking about today. And my bonus one-

Austin Wilson:

Bonus.

Josh Robb:

Will help you with a lot of these, which is-

Austin Wilson:

Tell me.

Josh Robb:

Seek help from a professional.

Austin Wilson:

Seek help.

Josh Robb:

And so if you have an advisor there to help you with this, they’ll help you be aware and review your finances, make sure you’re looking at those. They will hopefully help you review your insurance and make sure you’re adequately covered. They’ll make sure that your goals are right and you’re doing everything you need to do. That discipline that they have, it’ll help you along the way. Budgeting, making sure that you’re spending less-

Austin Wilson:

Yep. They’ll help you all over the place.

Josh Robb:

The financial advisor can help you along the way.

Austin Wilson:

Your insurance is where you need it to be, all these things. And that’s a great transition, Josh, a great plug because hey, maybe you don’t have that professional in your life. We might be able to help you. We might be a good fit. We might be able to work together. You can visit us on our website and check out the Invest With Us tab and we’d love to have a conversation. Maybe we could really benefit each other from working together and hopefully help to give you some of this financial peace and a great plan over a long term.

Josh Robb:

Yep. And that’s really what it comes down to is, I’ve seen too many people always looking to that endpoint. I just need to get here and then everything will be good. That’s a moving goalpost because as soon as you get there, you’re looking to the next and you just miss out on that enjoyment. So I just encourage everybody to slow down, take a step back, and say, how can I practice contentment when it comes to my finances? How can I be happy with where I am and enjoy the moment because the future’s not guaranteed?

Austin Wilson:

It’s not.

Josh Robb:

All right, well thank you Austin, those eight plus bonus-

Austin Wilson:

Eight plus bonus.

Josh Robb:

Topics for financial peace.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah. And thank you for listening to this episode. I appreciate you taking the time out of your week to listen. And please remember that if you had someone asking, oh man, I’m so stressed, I have anxiety about my money, well, you can share this episode with them. Hopefully, I’ll be able to help point them down the right track. And like I said earlier, email us any ideas at hello@theinvesteddads.com. And otherwise-

Josh Robb:

Talk to you later.

Austin Wilson:

Bye.

Thank you for listening to the Invested Dads Podcast. This episode has ended, but your journey towards a better financial future doesn’t have to. Head over to the investeddads.com to access all the links and resources mentioned in today’s show. If you enjoyed this episode and we had a positive impact on your life, leave us a review, click subscribe, and don’t miss the next episode.

Josh Robb and Austin Wilson work for Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. All opinions expressed by Josh, Austin, or any podcast guests are solely their own opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. This podcast is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon for investment decisions.

Clients of Hixon Zuercher Capital Management may maintain positions in the securities discussed in this podcast. There is no guarantee that the statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance may not be indicative of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. Securities investing involves risk, including the potential for loss of principle. There is no assurance that any investment plan or strategy will be successful.