205: Our Bold 2024 Predictions

How good are Josh & Austin at predicting the future of the market?

In this new episode, the guys revisit their 2023 predictions to find out if they were correct. In addition, they give some new predictions for 2024 including the economy, financial markets, elections, and more. Check it out!

 

Main Talking Points

[1:35] – Reviewing Our 2023 Predictions
[7:21] – Dad Joke of the Week
[7:46] – 2024 Predictions: Financial Markets, Economy, & More
[14:31] – Our Bonus Predictions

 

Links & Resources

Full Transcript

Welcome to The Invested Dads Podcast, simplifying financial topics so that you can take action and make your financial situation better, helping you to understand the current world of financial planning and investments. Here are your hosts, Josh Robb and Austin Wilson.

Austin Wilson:

All right. Hey, hey, hey, welcome back to the Invested Dads Podcast, a podcast where we take you on a journey to better your financial future. I’m Austin Wilson, Co-Portfolio Manager at Hixon Zuercher Capital Management.

Josh Robb:

And I’m Josh Robb, Director of Wealth Management at Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. Austin, how can people help us with our podcast?

Austin Wilson:

Please, please, please subscribe, if you’re not subscribed, that way you get new episodes when they drop on your podcast player each and every Thursday. And we’d love it if you’d visit our website at theinvesteddads.com. And you can sign up for our weekly newsletter where you’ll get a nice email with a link to listen as well as some fun show notes. So, go ahead and do that right now. While this is playing in the background while you go sign up for that and subscribing, we’re going to talk about our episode.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

So today-

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

I want to let everyone know that I am a little nerdy.

Josh Robb:

I like Microsoft Excel. It’s a good program.

Austin Wilson:

It’s a good program. I kind of live and breathe it. I spent a lot of time in my Microsoft Excel, built a lot of really cool models over the years. I believe it’s the single most effective way to analyze and manipulate data in the business world right now. And I really truly believe that mastering it is one way to set yourself apart from other employees, so you can maybe get promotions and new jobs and good opportunities, or candidates in the job application process.

So, what I’m going to be talking about today is 10 and yes, Josh 10.

Josh Robb:

Good.

Austin Wilson:

I picked a round –

Josh Robb:

Good choice.

Austin Wilson:

Easy numbers that everyone can remember. But my top 10 ways to move from the novice or beginner realm of Excel knowledge to what I would consider would be intermediate.

Josh Robb:

Okay.

Austin Wilson:

And I think that even as an intermediate, if you know all of these, you’re going to be light years ahead of your peers and light years ahead of your fellow job applicants. So as a matter of background, my knowledge really picked up as I took an excel for finance class. I think it was my sophomore year in college. And that actually made me have a random thought. So as my sophomore year, how do you spell sophomore? S-O-P-H-O-M-O-R-E. Why the heck do people, specifically in this part of the Midwest, the Northwestern Ohio area, I hear it a lot, say “South-moure”? S-O-U-T-H-M-O-U-R-E.

Josh Robb:

Oh, yeah. I never really noticed that.

Austin Wilson:

People. Listen. People who I know, who you know.

Josh Robb:

Okay.

Austin Wilson:

Say Southmoure.

Josh Robb:

Southmoure.

Austin Wilson:

Southmoure’s not a word.

Josh Robb:

Okay. No.

Austin Wilson:

So anyway, I don’t know. As I was typing the word sophomore in my note here, I was like, “Why do people say Southmoure up here?” That’s probably another discussion for another day.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

It might have a real reason, or it’s just like warsh. People are just wrong.

Josh Robb:

Oh.

Austin Wilson:

Anyway, I digress. But back to Excel, it was really my first job after college where I was a financial analyst at Cooper Tire, handling a lot of Excel sheets for various things at the time that I became pretty efficient. I learned from colleagues, tips and tricks and stuff like that, and that was great. But it was on the job work that really just made things sink in to me. And I think that when you use it in a real world, because it becomes a matter of necessity to do your job well or do it quickly, I think that’s the best way to learn.

So at that point, I was managing a lot of data, needing to get quick analysis as a result of that. So that’s kind of how I got to be where I am today. Now I use it for stock research and financial statement analysis, all kinds of different things that go way beyond even what we’re going to talk about today. But I use it a lot. I love it. So let’s just get right to it, Josh.

 

[3:40] – Excel Tip #1: Mastering Keyboard Shortcuts & Examples 

Austin Wilson:

Number one, I think everyone should master keyboard shortcuts. And these are simple things that aren’t just applicable for Excel, but really all functions in the Microsoft Suite work the same. You should never right click and click copy. Control C. You should always use your keyboard shortcuts. I think if you add up the time that you would save over the course of a year, it is hours.

Josh Robb:

It’s hours.

Austin Wilson:

Just by using these shortcuts right here. So control C.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Is copy.

Josh Robb:

I’m a fan of that. Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Control V is paste.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Pause. Why is it that instead of P?

Josh Robb:

I don’t know. Cause that’s pause. I don’t know.

Austin Wilson:

Control Z is undo. That’s a handy one.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Control S is save. And then I’ve, I’ve recently started using these last two, which really help when you’re formatting text.

Josh Robb:

Oh yeah.

Austin Wilson:

Control B is bold.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

And control I is italic.

Josh Robb:

Yep. And Underline. Control U.

Austin Wilson:

Oh, I’ve never used the underline. I learned something today. That’s cool. So those keyboard shortcuts alone many hours over the course of a year.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

Saved.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Weeks, years over the course of a career.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Could really set you apart.

Josh Robb:

Now I do believe it tells you those shortcuts in when you’re looking for them in most of the programs.

Austin Wilson:

Like if you hover over it or whatever.

Josh Robb:

Or even in, if you go to the edit and then you’re going to go copy, I think beside it’ll say Control C. So if you ever forget, I think it shows it to you. Cause they’re trying to encourage you to use it.

Austin Wilson:

Or get a little cheat sheet for your desk or something like that.

Josh Robb:

Oh yeah. While you’re learning it’s a good thing.

 

[5:08] – Excel Tip #2: Utilizing Conditional Formatting

Austin Wilson:

Absolutely. That’s number one. Number two, conditional formatting.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

Super helpful if you’re looking at data and trying to look at it visually based on a set of terms and conditions that you kind of decide whether you want highest to lowest or ranked or low to highest or whatever you want to do, you can conditionally format things or even color fills based on a value. You can conditionally format things so that based on the value in the cell, it will give you a correct way that it’s showing it. Whether that be a color or bold or anything like that. So that is a really cool thing that I am able to visualize data patterns more effectively.

Josh Robb:

Yes. Or you identify outliers or specific.

Austin Wilson:

Yep.

Josh Robb:

So if you’re saying, Hey, there’s this whole bunch of text I have, or numbers or whatever, give me the biggest or smallest, or you can get all that conditionally and then you don’t have to manually go through and find it.

Austin Wilson:

It’s so helpful.

Josh Robb:

So nice. You’re right.

 

[6:00] – Excel Tip #3: Pivot Tables for Large Data Sets

Austin Wilson:

Number three, and this is one of my favorites.

Josh Robb:

You like them.

Austin Wilson:

Pivot tables. So if you have a large, this doesn’t, this doesn’t the most beneficial for small data sets, but a large data set, if you can, you insert a pivot table. So you’ll select the whole table and then insert a pivot table that allows you to drag and drop and sum and total in many, many different ways. And you can see percentage of totals and all this stuff. So it is a very quick way to analyze massive amounts of data.

So specifically in a prior life, I was dealing with data dumps out of an ERP called SAP. SAP is a very popular enterprise resource planning software. But we were exporting data for an entire corporation or an entire plant. Thousands of line items, thousands of cells. And it would, you can’t analyze that with your eyes.

Josh Robb:

Nope.

Austin Wilson:

So you need to summarize the data in some way, shape, or form. And that was the way to do that. So pivot tables are wonderful. They’re super easy to refresh. If you just overwrite the data points with new data, you can just right click on the table and refresh it and it gives you a new table summarizing all those things. So I use pivot tables quite a bit. I think they’re super helpful, even in our world, where I can export client data and then if I want to have formulas based on certain client data, I can have real time updated data because of the pivot table. So pivot tables are pretty cool.

 

[7:22] – Excel Tip #4: Using Format Painter 

Austin Wilson:

Number four, and this is one I just taught my wife recently. Cause she said, “Hey, is there a way to do this?” And I was like, “Absolutely there is.” Format painter.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

So if you have it set up on your Excel, or this actually works in Word as well. You can see there’s a little paintbrush on the upper left. And if you select something that is formatted the way you like, whether that be a cell or range of cells or a word or a number or anything, and you click that format painter button, that little paintbrush.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

You can then select another cell you want it to match. And it will, it’ll format it the exact same, same way.

Josh Robb:

Oh yeah.

Austin Wilson:

Now here is something that a lot of people don’t know is double click it.

Josh Robb:

Double click.

Austin Wilson:

If you double click it, you can then select a bunch of different cells and format it the same way or a bunch of different-

Josh Robb:

That’s a pro hack right there.

Austin Wilson:

It’s super great.

Josh Robb:

Nice.

Austin Wilson:

So format painter also, this is another one that you can save hours and hours and hours by not having to go find the font, find the size, find the color or the condition, you can, your format painter will-

Josh Robb:

Everything.

Austin Wilson:

Will do conditional formatting for you too. It’s super great. It’s one of my favorite hacks-

Josh Robb:

I use it a lot.

Austin Wilson:

I use it every day.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

 

[8:29] – Excel Tip #5: Mastering LOOKUP Functions 

Austin Wilson:

Number five. This is a pretty cool one. So you’ve heard of maybe the term V lookup?

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

This is kind of one of the earlier versions of this function, and that’s where if you want to look at a data point that corresponds to another data point that you have, and then bring in a different cell that’s adjacent to it or whatever, you can select the data point, then select the range you’re looking for that data point to match and then select the other one you want it to return, which could be a handful of columns in or whatever.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

And it’ll do that.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

It’s called VLOOKUP. Well then there is another version of that, which is an H lookup, which is the inverse, which is really just looking up and down instead of side to side. And it can do the same thing. And then there’s a newer function, which is actually called XLOOKUP, which will do both.

Josh Robb:

Oh my goodness.

Austin Wilson:

Or either one. So that is a super specific thing to be able to-

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

Suppose you have an account number. This is one example in our world, but whatever export you have, didn’t have the name with it or whatever. But another export you have has the account number and the name. You could select the account number, then look up from the other range, the account number with the name, and then select return the name for it.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Super handy. We use it all the time. It’s a really helpful tool. So that is V lookup or H lookup or X lookup. So those are the top five, Josh, not in any particular order, but I think we’re getting a little jacked up. I’m pretty passionate about this.

 

[9:51] – Dad Joke of the Week 

Josh Robb:

All right. So in honor of you talking about your top 10 Excel tips, I have an Excel joke for you.

Austin Wilson:

Is it excel-lent?

Josh Robb:

It will be amazing. Here we go. So I was talking to my dad the other day about Excel.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah.

Josh Robb:

And I asked him, dad, do you know any Excel formulas? And he said, “Yep. Sum.”

Austin Wilson:

Some. S-U-M.

Josh Robb:

Yep. That’s a good one. That’s simple.

Austin Wilson:

See, that was a little too basic I think even for this.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

 

[10:18] – Excel Tip #6: Knowing How to Remove Duplicates 

Austin Wilson:

All right. Number six, remove duplicates.

Josh Robb:

Oh yeah, I do this a lot.

Austin Wilson:

So this is in the data tab. So in our world, another example of this is you export a bunch of data. We would be using maybe client account data or something like that. And maybe each account is listed more than one time because of all these underlying holdings. But you only want to see the total number of accounts, or listed accounts. You could select that whole column, which has duplicates in it, many duplicates, and you right click. You could do it that way. Or you could go to the data tab, which is the easy one, an easy way to do that. Click the remove duplicates function, and it will leave you only the unique values. Which is super helpful, so you don’t have duplicates. Wonderful.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

 

[11:00] – Excel Tip #7: Mastering Find & Replace Tools 

Austin Wilson:

So I use that a lot of times as well. Really useful in cleaning up data to ensure the data is really accurate. Number seven, control F. Another shortcut for you here. Type what you’re looking for, it will find that and you highlight it for you.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

Control H is the alternative to that. So if you have a name, so yeah, suppose you want to find Robb and you want to change it to Ron. So you could say Control H, R-O-B-B on the top piece, and then underneath it replace with R-O-N. So Josh, Robb, every time it’s listed in that whole thing would become Josh, Ron.

Josh Robb:

There you go.

 

[11:39] – Excel Tip #8: Customizing Number Formats 

Austin Wilson:

And that it’s actually a helpful thing in real terms. But that’s a hypothetical example there. So that’s number seven. Number eight, custom number format. So you can actually, first of all, there’s all the dropdown of percentage and-

Josh Robb:

Yeah, they’re premade ones.

Austin Wilson:

Currency.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

You can do all of those are great. And I use those the majority of the time.

Josh Robb:

And there’s even the quick ones right up on the bottom there.

Austin Wilson:

Yes.

Josh Robb:

Like dollars, percentages are like the two people use all the time.

Austin Wilson:

And that’ll get you 90% of what you need. However, there are certain times that you need, maybe you want it to always list USD at the end. You can set it up to really format in any way, shape, or form. You just have to give it an example of what to do that and then write a code for it. But you could custom your number formats. So that’s really a cool handy way to do that as well. And then you can save them and use them in the future.

Josh Robb:

And I think that might be useful if, let’s say for instance, account numbers have a dash, you don’t want a dash, or you need a dash and it doesn’t have one. Those are a lot of times, phone numbers.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah.

Josh Robb:

There’s a prebuilt one for phone numbers. But if you like a certain way a phone number shows up, maybe you don’t like the brackets.

Austin Wilson:

Yep.

Josh Robb:

And do it different.

Austin Wilson:

That really, that brings up, these aren’t even on the list. They’re calling audible here.

Josh Robb:

All right.

Austin Wilson:

Concatenate.

Josh Robb:

Ooh.

Austin Wilson:

Yes, I like that word. So if you have a first name, that’s one field and a last name, that’s one field. But you want them together, you want first name, last name, or last name become a first name or space in the middle. You could use the concatenate function. This is a bonus. It’s not even in the top 10.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

But you say equals concatenate. Grab one, then comma, quotation mark, space, quotation mark, comma, grab the other one and then boom, you’re done. You have first name, last name.

Josh Robb:

Oh boy.

Austin Wilson:

It’s wonderful.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

So it’s super helpful.

Josh Robb:

I’m sure it’s very easy to picture what you just said in auto form, what it looks like on the screen.

 

[13:24] – Excel Tip #9: Learning Paste Special Tools 

Austin Wilson:

As these people are driving, they’re listening to this podcast. So that’s concatenate. That’s not even what we’re going to talk about. Number nine though, this is where Josh alluded to earlier. So suppose you control C, copy something, then you want to go paste it in a different area of the spreadsheet. Okay. You control V, that’s going to return it the same way-

Josh Robb:

Exactly.

Austin Wilson:

That it was. And if it’s a formula, it’ll copy it as a formula instead of as other things. Now, sometimes you want to paste the value. Sometimes you want to paste a picture. Sometimes you want to paste just the text. Sometimes you want to paste the column width or the color or the this or the that. There are ways to do that. Instead of form copying it and pasting it as it was, you can copy and paste certain aspects of it. That would be called paste special. And you could use control alt V instead of just control V for paste, control Alt V. And that’ll bring you up a number of ways to paste.

Josh Robb:

Or right click.

Austin Wilson:

Or right-

Josh Robb:

And they’re all listed right there.

Austin Wilson:

They are. That’s actually how I do it.

Josh Robb:

That’s the faster one, I think, in this instance.

Austin Wilson:

Because then you say, you have to select it either way.

Josh Robb:

Yeah, you got to pick it.

Austin Wilson:

Yeah. That is how I do it. Right click. And then the other, the list of how to paste it.

Josh Robb:

As values-

Austin Wilson:

One, the best way that I have found this to be used is the values function. So if I have a sum of something and I want to copy that sum, I don’t want to copy the formula of the sum.

Josh Robb:

Yeah. The number.

Austin Wilson:

I want to copy the number of the sum, and then I will right click and then copy pastes values. And I get the number.

Josh Robb:

The number.

Austin Wilson:

I get the number.

Josh Robb:

There’s the word.

 

[14:56] – Excel Tip #10: Saving Time with Quick Navigation Tools 

Austin Wilson:

So paste special is the answer. And then another one that will save you light years –

Josh Robb:

This is it.

Austin Wilson:

– Of time because, and I didn’t know this for a while, admittedly for a little bit into my career, but if you scroll.

Josh Robb:

Takes a while.

Austin Wilson:

It takes, if you have a hundred thousand line items, which is real in some instances, if you scroll, you’re going to be scrolling all day. So the shortcut is called quick navigation. Quick navigation uses control and the arrow keys up or down or side to side and goes, as long as there’s data in there, it’ll skip all the way to the top, or the bottom or the side or the side. And that will save you years. It’s amazing.

Josh Robb:

You run into the stop if there’s ever a gap.

Austin Wilson:

Yes. If there’s a blank-

Josh Robb:

A blank in there you get stuck. But yes, that is a great way of doing it. I think that one a lot of times speeds up because you could drag way past it.

Austin Wilson:

Oh yeah.

Josh Robb:

You get impatient and just jump way too far. And then you got to go backwards.

Austin Wilson:

This will prevent you-

Josh Robb:

Cause excel’s unlimited. I mean, there’s not an end to the Excel sheet unless-

Austin Wilson:

In the real world.

Josh Robb:

In the real world. There is an end, but there’s really not an end to the Excel sheet. If you’re there, you probably need different software if you get to that point. But you could really scroll too far. So you’re right. That’s a quick way of jumping. And you can also hold a shift key if you are highlighting along the way to get those.

Austin Wilson:

Or you could use control shift and the arrow to highlight them all.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

And then you could control C them and put them somewhere else. I use that all the time.

Josh Robb:

Yep.

Austin Wilson:

All right. So we’re getting a little nerdy here. That is the top 10.

Josh Robb:

10.

 

[16:24] – Ways to Improve Your Excel Game & Become a Pro 

Austin Wilson:

Now, I believe, as I mentioned earlier, that top 10 alone will take you from novice stage to the intermediate stage of Microsoft Excel. And put you ahead of three quarters of your peers and three quarters of job applicants for the same job you’re applying for, which is great. We love that. And we’re happy to help you do that. So master those. I would say we could and should take this another step further in another episode where we’ll go and look at the 10 different functions and tools to go from intermediate to advanced. So stay tuned in a future episode for that. And that is going to be things like, my bonus tip here would be to learn to use, write and understand macros, which is essentially using VBA coding to write programming for Excel.

It’s extremely powerful. So we’ll stay tuned for that. That’s something we’re going to talk about as well. A couple tips on how to improve at Excel, because everyone needs improvement. Even me, I live in it every day. Even me, I have had to ask for help.

Josh Robb:

Oh yeah.

Austin Wilson:

Google, I YouTube, which is going to be what I talk about, but I’ve actually had to ask for professional help. Like I need this to do this, and I don’t know how to do it. And it’s very helpful.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

So how to improve at Excel, take a class. They’re often free classes. There’s cheap paid classes. You need college classes, whatever. If you’re in college, take an elective. Super helpful. Probably some good options there. Number two, learn on the job. You’re going to learn on the job. That’s really going to help. And I really think that’s going to be the most beneficial and best way to learn, period.

Number three, use it every day. If you’re in the business world, you’re probably using it every day, but just continue to use it. And the more you use it, the more familiar and comfortable you are going to be with it. Another one is YouTube. YouTube is huge. If you want to learn how to do X, Y, Z in Excel, there’s probably a video on it.

Josh Robb:

Yep. I do that a lot when I’m trying to put out, because in Excel you could do formulas. We’ve talked about that. There’s all different ones, all different functions. And sometimes I know what I want, but I’m not sure which formula is best used for that. Maybe there’s two, a couple different options. And then I’m just kind of Google kind of, how do you in Excel, get blah, blah, blah. Then you can kind of get that end result.

And I do that a lot because I kind of know where I want to end up, but I’m not sure the most efficient way to get there.

Austin Wilson:

So this is something that I think we could justify a business expense for, but there is a paid subscription to what’s called Excelformulabot.com or something like that. I’ve played around with it. It’s an add in for Excel, and it uses AI.

Josh Robb:

Ooh.

Austin Wilson:

To write formulas based on natural language. So you can say-

Josh Robb:

You tell them what you want-

Austin Wilson:

I want to do this, and it will understand what you want to do and then spit out the formula for you. It’s like $5 a month. So I think we can justify that.

Josh Robb:

Interesting.

Austin Wilson:

So anyway, that’s another option. And I’ve played around with that. I don’t have it currently, but I’ve played around with it.

So I guess final thoughts, I’ll start.

Josh Robb:

Yes.

Austin Wilson:

Excel is something that is, it’s truly a powerful business tool, and I think that everyone going into the business world and specifically the finance world needs to have a really good understanding of. I do think you’re going to get the most exposure in your first job in real world learning there than you are even in school and courses and stuff like that. But you need to be somewhat prepared. But I truly think that the way to differentiate yourself and have really good job security, you could be the go-to guy for X, Y, Z. One way to do that is to master Excel. And then if you can do that, your job is secure, you’re going to have opportunities, you’re going to have chances to lead and chances to be the point guy for X, Y, Z, it’s a great thing.

So take advantage of it. I think it’s a powerful tool. But if the converse is also true, if you’re not as good at Excel as maybe your colleagues or as your peers for this job application or whatever, you’re probably going to be overlooked for opportunities or for promotions or for the job. So at least be up to par. But I’m saying this list will get you above par.

Josh Robb:

And really my question is why are we spending so much time talking about this one software? And it comes down to, in my mind, and I agree with what you just said, what I’m looking to hire people, depending, even in the role, maybe it’s not even an advisor, but just an operations role or something like that. Or even in the non-financial world, if you can show me some skills in Excel, to me that translates the ability to problem solve.

Because Excel is a very wide open tool. And if you can utilize that, it shows me that you can learn or problem solve in other software.

Austin Wilson:

Right?

Josh Robb:

Because this is really just a fundamental for what you can do in a lot of other programs. We have specific software for trading, retirement planning. We use software design for different tasks that I could probably do in Excel, just not as efficiently. And so for me personally, when I’m looking at this, the reason why Excel is so important is because it really drives back to the ability to take a problem and navigate around it to say, “I know what I want.” Like I talked about when I’m Googling, “I know what I want. Can I take this software and manipulate it to get me my end result?” And if you can show me your ability to do that, then I have high confidence you can also take a program or a problem somewhere else and take the same mindset approach to solving it.

So that’s why I like Excel in watching people or seeing how they utilize it, is just to say, how can you take this and show me your problem solving skills?

Austin Wilson:

Yep.

Josh Robb:

That’s really how I see it as a benefit as a candidate, especially for job applications, is to say, “Hey, look at, this is a program that’s very open that I am comfortable in and figuring out the issue or the problem.”

Austin Wilson:

Absolutely. Well, thank you for listening. If you had someone asking about Excel, you can share this episode with them. Hopefully it would help them out. We’d love it if you’d subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. And don’t forget to check us out on social media. We’re active on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and we’d love to connect with you there. If you have any questions or content ideas.

Josh Robb:

Yeah.

Austin Wilson:

Shoot us an email at hello@theinvesteddads.com. And until next Thursday, enjoy your spreadsheets and have some fun with that, and we’ll see you then.

Josh Robb:

All right, talk to you later.

Austin Wilson:

Bye.

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Josh Robb and Austin Wilson work for Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. All opinions expressed by Josh, Austin or any podcast guest are solely their own opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Hixon Zuercher Capital Management. This podcast is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon for investment decisions. Clients of Hixon Zuercher Capital Management may maintain positions in the securities discussed in this podcast. There is no guarantee that the statements, opinions or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance may not be indicative of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. Securities investing involves risk, including the potential for loss of principle. There is no assurance that any investment plan or strategy will be successful.